BYPASS: FACTS & GUIDANCE

CUT THE ARUNDEL BYPASS SHORT
DON’T CARVE UP TORTINGTON

Here in Tortington most of us are unashamedly against a bypass being driven right through the middle of our ancient rural parish. But having read the Consultation Document it might be worthwhile adding a few summary points to help you complete the questionnaire. Click HERE for the online questionnaire – it’s way down at the bottom of that page!

 

 

Why we should CHOOSE OPTION 1 – the Short Bypass route

Option 1 is the only option that satisfies all SEVEN of Highways England’s primary AIMS of a new bypass

  • it IMPROVES CAPACITY
  • it ELIMINATES CONGESTION
  • it IMPROVES JOURNEY TIME
  • it IMPROVES SAFETY
  • it IMPROVES ACCESSIBILITY
  • it MINIMISES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
  • it MINIMISES IMPACT on the SOUTH DOWNS NATIONAL PARK

In addition, it is the SHORTEST route, the LEAST EXPENSIVE route and the one most likely to be COMPLETED on time and on budget.

 

Why we should REJECT OPTION 3 – the Tortington route

Option 3 is the most damaging option for ancient woodland, productive agricultural land and the existing recreational use of the countryside, within and just outside the South Downs National Park

  • the Tortington route (formerly the Pink/Blue route) was REJECTED in 2005 by the then Transport Secretary because it would have a detrimental impact on the ENVIRONMENT
  • 33% of TORTINGTON is in the SOUTH DOWNS NATIONAL PARK
  • the Tortington route is the route which requires by far the largest land take of ANCIENT WOODLAND for the bypass corridor
  • the Tortington route would have the largest ECOLOGICAL MITIGATION costs of all three routes
  • the Tortington route would have to avoid the remains of ancient monument TORTINGTON PRIORY which had undergone an award-winning restoration in 2001, avoid two other LISTED BUILDINGS and would destroy an area of ARCHAEOLOGICAL INTEREST linked to the excavations at Goblestubbs Copse including a ROMAN ROAD  across the northern end of Tortington Common
  • no one can say how many species would be endangered by loss of habitat and habitat fragmentation in Tortington Common but as part of the BINSTED WOODS COMPLEX Site of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCI) a nationally important habitat and wildlife corridor is under imminent threat
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